Spring Woodland Wildflower Sampler #4

Today, I returned to Anchor-Diamond Park at Hawkwood Estate in the Town of Ballston to continue my wildflower inventory.  This sunny day did not disappoint!

As I mentioned in the first installment of this series of spring woodland wildflower samplers, the greening of our landscape occurs quickly each spring.  Things now appear quite lush with much shade already blanketing much of the forest floor.  Another indication of the vernal progression underway is the winding down of the earliest of our spring wildflowers – the “spring ephemerals.”  Some species, such as Trout Lily, are already exhibiting yellow leaves, which indicate that those plants are already going dormant to await another growing season.  And to think they were still in bloom just two weeks ago!  By early June, there will be no evidence in this woodland that Trout Lily thrive throughout this park.

My point?  Get out there and enjoy your favorite outdoors destination each season and observe the nuances of each season!

Among the wildflowers in bloom at this time –

Cleavers

Mayapple

Wild Geranium

Sweet Cicely

Jack-in-the-pulpit  (Note the purple coloration.)

Northern Jack-in-the-pulpit  (Note the absence of purple coloration.)

Starflower

Canada Mayflower

Dog Violet

Fringed Polygala

Spring Cress

Dwarf Raspberry

Pennsylvania Bittercress

White Baneberry

Marsh Blue Violet – lots of them!

Marsh Blue Violet – a closer look…

Smaller Forget-me-not

Happy trails!

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Spring Woodland Wildflower Sampler #3

On my way to the office yesterday, the day’s sunny beginning inspired me to stop at Bauer Environmental Park (located in the Town of Colonie) to see if I could find any Painted Trillium in bloom.  I have not yet had the pleasure of seeing that particular beautiful wildflower in bloom on any of my wildflower inventory walks this spring.  I’m glad I stopped!

A walk along this boardwalk trail offered these blooms to enjoy –

Pink Lady’s-slipper

Painted Trillium

Yellow Clintonia

Miterwort

Small-flowered Crowfoot

Starflower

Canada Mayflower

Common Blue Violet

Sweet White Violet

Marsh Blue Violet

Bulbous Buttercup – note that sepals are pointed downward

Celandine

Since I was rewarded with not only seeing a Painted Trillium but also my first Pink Lady’s-slipper of the year, I decided to make an additional quick stop at Ann Lee Pond Nature and Historic Preserve (located nearby, also in the Town of Colonie) to check on the blooming status of another of my favorite spring woodland wildflowers.

After a brisk walk across the new bridge across Ann Lee Pond, I walked that path a short distance to where it forks in the woods.  I found one of those shrubs, Early Azalea, to be loaded with many plump flower buds.  They should be opening very soon!

I found these blooms during my short visit –

Fig Buttercup

Chokecherry

Black Chokeberry

Morrow’s Honeysuckle

Bell’s Honeysuckle

Happy trails!

Spring Woodland Wildflower Sampler #2

On my way to the office on this chilly but sunny Monday morning, I stopped by the Ann Lee Pond Nature and Historic Preserve (located in the Town of Colonie) to do a quick peek at what spring wildflowers were in bloom.

Given the continuing rains we have been experiencing, the trails were soggy.  In fact, there were many sizeable puddles (some ankle deep!) along each trail.  No worries for me.  I typically wear rubber knee boots for just such (frequent) occasions!

I was disheartened because I was unable to find a single emerging Painted Trillium.  For the past several years, I had found only one in bloom along the loop trail.  Not this year.  Perhaps not again?

However, I did find these blooms along my way –

Sessile-leaved Bellwort

Starflower

Highbush Blueberry

Dwarf Ginseng

Wild Sarsaparilla (Blooms are below the leaf along left edge of image.)

Wild Sarsaparilla (Close-up view of blooms.)

Goldthread

Common Wintercress

Flowering Dogwood

Flowering Dogwood (Close-up view of blooms.)

Marsh Marigold

Happy trails!

Spring Woodland Wildflower Sampler

The pace of the greening of the landscape has quickened substantially over the past week.  Please be sure that you seize your opportunities to get out and observe the season’s emergence of new plants and its showy blooms whenever you can.

Yesterday, I visited Anchor-Diamond Park at Hawkwood Estate in the Town of Ballston to continue my wildflower inventory.  It was quite an observational bonanza!  I spied twenty-three additional species (most not blooming) for this property as well as finding several species along trails in addition to where I had originally observed them.

Among the wildflowers in bloom at this time –

Jack-in-the-pulpit

Marsh Marigold

Wake Robin

Small-flowered Crowfoot

Downy Yellow Violet

Yellow Trout Lily

Sessile-leaved Bellwort

Northern Jack-in-the-pulpit

Red-berried Elder

Red Baneberry

American Fly Honeysuckle

Northern Prickly Ash

Northern White Violet

Dwarf Ginseng

Miterwort

Wooly Blue Violet

Happy trails!

A spring bouquet…of first blooms

With the emergence and blooming of spring wildflowers now well underway, I wanted to offer this sampler – a bouquet if you will – of the blooming sequence of some wildflowers I’ve observed thus far.

Skunk Cabbage

Skunk Cabbage

Beaked Hazelnut

Beaked Hazelnut

American Hazelnut

American Hazelnut

Smooth Alder

Smooth Alder

Coltsfoot

Coltsfoot

Sharp-lobed Hepatica

Sharp-lobed Hepatica

Spicebush

Spicebush

Leatherwood

Leatherwood

Ground Ivy

Ground Ivy

Round-lobed Hepatica

Round-lobed Hepatica

Small-flowered Crowfoot

Small-flowered Crowfoot

Marsh Marigold

Marsh Marigold

Wood Anemone

Wood Anemone

Northern White Violet

Northern White Violet

Smooth Yellow Violet

Smooth Yellow Violet

Common Blue Violet

Common Blue Violet

Bloodroot

Bloodroot

Trout Lily

Trout Lily

Wake Robin

Wake Robin

Selkirk's Violet

Selkirk’s Violet

Common Shadbush

Common Shadbush

Dwarf Ginseng

Dwarf Ginseng

Garlic Mustard

Garlic Mustard

NOTE:  Garlic Mustard is a highly invasive species.  If you’d like to help in eradicating (or at least mitigating) the presence of this species, please check out these recipes and eat your way to a Garlic Mustard-free planet!

Henbit

Henbit

Sessile-leaved Bellwort

Sessile-leaved Bellwort

Hobblebush

Hobblebush

Wild Strawberry

Wild Strawberry

NOTE:  Wild Strawberries can be distinguished from Wood Strawberries by examining the relationship of the leaves to the blooms (or, later, to the fruit).  The leaves of Wild Strawberry (shown above) are typically above the blooms/fruits; the leaves of Wood Strawberry (shown below) are nearly always below the blooms/fruits.  Both species are common throughout our area and are frequently found together.

Wood Strawberry

Wood Strawberry

Early Winter Cress

Early Winter Cress

Dog Violet

Dog Violet

Jack-in-the-Pulpit

Jack-in-the-Pulpit

NOTE:  Jack-in-the-Pulpit (shown above) exhibits purple coloration, even if only sparingly.  Northern Jack-in-the-Pulpit (shown below) does not exhibit any purple coloration.  Both species are relatively common throughout our area and are often found together.

Northern Jack-in-the-Pulpit

Northern Jack-in-the-Pulpit

Miterwort

Miterwort

Foamflower

Foamflower

American Black Currant

American Black Currant

Red Baneberry

Red Baneberry

Field Pennycress

Field Pennycress

Ovate-leaved Violet

Ovate-leaved Violet

Toothwort

Toothwort

Golden Alexanders

Golden Alexanders

Dwarf Raspberry

Dwarf Raspberry

Golden Ragwort

Golden Ragwort

Wild Geranium

Wild Geranium

Garden Red Currant

Garden Red Currant

Celandine

Celandine

Swamp Buttercup

Swamp Buttercup

Long-spurred Violet

Long-spurred Violet

Hooked Crowfoot

Hooked Crowfoot

Striped Maple

Striped Maple

Starflower

Starflower

Painted Trillium-blog header-spring

Painted Trillium

Highbush Blueberry-blog header-spring

Highbush Blueberry

Goldthread

Hawthorn

Hawthorn

Pink Lady's Slipper

Pink Lady’s Slipper

Cleavers

Cleavers

Canada Mayflower

Canada Mayflower

NOTE:  The scent of this bloom resembles lily-of-the-valley, hence its other common name, False Lily-of-the-Valley.  When found together as a large cluster and in full bloom, these tiny flowers produce a surprisingly potent perfume.  I recommend hiking the loop trail at Ann Lee Pond Nature & Historic Preserve when these are in full bloom (later this month and into very early June) if you’d like to experience this olfactory delight.

Pineapple Weed

Pineapple Weed

NOTE:  When crushed, the blooms of this plant smell like fresh-cut pineapple.  View this recipe for tea.

Early Azalea

Black Chokeberry

Black Chokeberry

Indian Cucumber Root

Indian Cucumber Root

Yellow Clintonia

Yellow Clintonia

Blue Scorpion Grass (Myosotis stricta)

Blue Scorpion Grass

Mayapple

Mayapple

Tower-mustard

Tower-mustard

Prickly Dewberry

Prickly Dewberry

Sweet Woodruff (Galium odoratum)

Sweet Woodruff

May and June are the best times to view the most species of blooming wildflowers in whatever types of habitat that your nature outings explore.  Wondering where to visit next?  Check out my Area Nature Preserves, Parks and Trails page for inspiration.

Happy trails!

A Sampler of Spring Woodland Wildflowers – Part 4 (Final Chapter)

Today, I returned to 100 Acre Wood in the Town of Malta to continue my wildflower inventory.  The parade of spring woodland wildflowers is coming to a close; summer is just around the corner!

I hope you enjoy the continuation (and culmination) of this sampler of what is in bloom this week in a nearby woodland; take a look.

Partridgeberry

Partridgeberry

Prickly Dewberry

Prickly Dewberry

Debtford Pink

Debtford Pink

Hop Clover

Hop Clover

Multi-flora Rose

Multi-flora Rose

Honewort

Honewort

Common Speedwell

Common Speedwell

Indian Cucumber Root

Indian Cucumber Root

Spreading Dogbane

Spreading Dogbane

Bristly Dewberry

Bristly Dewberry

Field Hawkweed

Field Hawkweed

Whorled Loosestrife

Whorled Loosestrife

Small Sundrops

Small Sundrops

Other species also in bloom today included:

  • Alsike Clover
  • Black Medick
  • Common Blue-eyed Grass
  • Common Cinquefoil
  • Common Evening Primrose
  • Cow Vetch
  • Daisy Fleabane
  • Dwarf Cinquefoil
  • Eastern Blue-eyed Grass
  • False Solomon’s Seal
  • Foxglove Beardtongue
  • Ground Ivy
  • Henbit
  • Lesser Stitchwort
  • Low Bindweed
  • Low Hop Clover
  • Mouse-ear Chickweed
  • Oxeye Daisy
  • Red Clover
  • Sulphur Cinquefoil
  • Thimbleberry
  • Tower-mustard
  • White Campion
  • White Clover
  • Yellow Wood Sorrel

For a look at what some of these additional species look like, view the early spring collection of wildflowers and also view the late spring collection of wildflowers elsewhere on my blog.

Happy trails!

A Sampler of Spring Woodland Wildflowers – Part 3

Today, I returned to 100 Acre Wood in the Town of Malta to continue my wildflower inventory.  Despite the lack of any significant rainfall in weeks, the parade of spring woodland wildflowers continues.

I hope you enjoy the continuation of this sampler of what is in bloom this week in a nearby woodland; take a look.

Pink Lady's Slipper

Pink Lady’s Slipper

Mayapple

Mayapple

Dog Violet

Dog Violet

False Solomon's Seal

False Solomon’s Seal

Canada Mayflower

Canada Mayflower

Common Cinquefoil

Common Cinquefoil

Dwarf Cinquefoil

Dwarf Cinquefoil

Birdsfoot Trefoil

Birdsfoot Trefoil – truthfully, this plant was growing along a portion of the trail near Luther Forest Boulevard; it was not “in the woods.”

Tower-mustard

Tower-mustard – – truthfully, this plant was growing along a portion of the trail near Luther Forest Boulevard; it was not “in the woods.”

Hairy Solomon's Seal (2 blooms on left, others unopened flowerbuds)

Hairy Solomon’s Seal (2 blooms on left; others are unopened flowerbuds)

Bellwort

Bellwort

Hispid Buttercup

Hispid Buttercup

Other species also in bloom today included:

  • Starflower
  • Ovate-leaved Violet
  • Sessile-leaved Bellwort
  • Early Low Blueberry
  • Highbush Blueberry
  • Small-flowered Crowfoot
  • Dwarf Ginseng
  • Marsh Blue Violet
  • Cleavers
  • Chokecherry
  • Common Buckthorn
  • Pennsylvania Bitter Cress
  • Rue Anemone
  • Fringed Polygala
  • Wild Strawberry
  • Wood Strawberry
  • Mouse-ear Chickweed
  • Garlic Mustard

For a look at what some of these additional species look like, view the early spring collection of wildflowers elsewhere on my blog.

Happy trails!