A tribute to Old Yeller

No, not the iconic movie.  The color.

Today, while continuing my wildflower inventory along the Community Connector Trail, it quickly became apparent what the color du jour would be for blooming wildflowers during this outing.

Thus, please take a peek at what I observed along the trail –

Downy False Foxglove

Oxeye

Common St. Johnswort

Fringed Loosestrife

Agrimony

Rough Cinquefoil

Wormseed Mustard

Fall Dandelion

Garden Loosestrife

Birdsfoot Trefoil

Black-eyed Susan

Common Mullein

Smooth Ground Cherry

Common Evening Primrose

Yellow Wood Sorrel

Bristly Crowfoot

Yellow Sweetclover

Wild Parsnip

Common Dandelion

Pineapple Weed

Smooth Sumac

Clammy Ground Cherry

Nipplewort

Tall Buttercup

Moneywort

Sulphur Cinquefoil

Old Yeller.  Well, I think I just might be in the mood for a good movie right about now.  Going to go grab a bucket of popcorn and fire up the VCR (just kidding)…and grab a box of tissues.

Happy trails!

Advertisements

Summer Wildflower Sampler – Community Connector Trail

Despite a forecasted temperature in the mid-90s and an even higher heat index, I opted to stretch my legs today along the Community Connector Trail in the Towns of Clifton Park and Halfmoon.  Beginning from the Town of Halfmoon end, I continued my wildflower inventory by covering the eastern half of this trail.  I was pleased to discover several species to add to my list and enjoyed seeing a multitude of colorful blooms.  Fortunately, the heat has not yet stressed the plants.

Here’s a sample of what I observed –

Fringed Loosestrife

Canada Lily (orange variety)

Creeping Bellflower

Pale Umbrellawort

Swamp Milkweed

Enchanter’s Nightshade

White Vervain

White Avens

Common Mullein

Cow Vetch

Red Baneberry berries

Yellow Sweetclover

White Sweetclover

Moneywort (invasive)

Chicory

Tall Meadow Rue

Blue Vervain

Garden Loosestrife (invasive)

Pokeweed

Rough Cinquefoil

Thimbleweed

Canada Thistle (invasive)

Bull Thistle

American Basswood

Flowering Rush (invasive)

Canada Lily (yellow variety)

Mayweed

SUPPLEMENTAL UPDATE (7/1/2018):  I returned to inventory the western half of this trail and observed these additional blooms –

Swamp Rose

Meadowsweet

Spotted Knapweed (invasive)

Please join me Thursday evening, July 12, for a walk to identify invasive species at the Vischer Ferry Nature and Historic Preserve – we will see many of the “invasive” plants noted above during that walk.  We’ll begin promptly at 6pm from the parking lot adjacent to the Whipple Bridge at the main entrance to the preserve, located at the intersection of Riverview Road and Van Vranken Road, and then take a short hike through a portion of this preserve, which will go along a segment of the Community Connector Trail.  This event is in recognition of New York Invasive Species Awareness Week, July 8-14, 2018.  I hope you’ll join me.

Happy trails!

Spring Wildflower Sampler – Final Installment

With the days of spring winding down on a beautiful sunny day yesterday, I continued my wildflower inventory at Settlers Hill Natural Area.  This trail network is located in the Town of Clifton Park and it is comprised of two different segments –

  • East trail: Beginning at Gloucester Street, this trail segment heads south across Clifton Park Center Road, Michelle Drive, Waverly Place, Summerlin Drive and Avenue of the Oaks (twice) before terminating a short distance south of 4 Leaf Manor.
  • West trail: Beginning at either access point off Addison Way or Fairhill Road, these two access trails will intersect and then this trail segment heads west across Moe Road before generally heading south and terminating at Wildflower Drive.

Trail users were few and far between except for the resident chipmunks and squirrels.  Songs and calls from Wood Thrush (forests), Rose-breasted Grosbeak (forest edges), Pileated Woodpecker (forests), Common Yellowthroat (brushy old fields or thickets along edge of wetlands), Yellow Warbler (open woodland), Northern Cardinal (open woodland), White-breasted Nuthatch (forests), Song Sparrow (open woodland and edges of wetlands), Eastern Towhee (edges of forests, thickets, and old fields), American Goldfinch (open woodland), and Eastern Wood Peewee (woodland) illustrated the varied habits that I strolled through along my route.

This is sampler of what I observed blooming –

Partridgeberry

Foxglove Beardtongue

You’ll find all three species of Blue-eyed Grasses along this trail network:

Eastern Blue-eyed Grass

Stout Blue-eyed Grass

Common Blue-eyed Grass

Slender Vetch

Gray Dogwood

Wild Parsnip – CAUTION!  Avoid handling this plant; read more.

Lesser Daisy Fleabane

Daisy Fleabane

Horse Nettle

Common Milkweed

Staghorn Sumac

Hop Clover

Hoary Alyssum

Common Elderberry – Edible fruit will ripen around mid-August; read more.

White Avens

Whorled Loosestrife

Sulphur Cinquefoil

Maiden Pink

Selfheal

Smaller Forget-me-nots

Happy trails!

View the expanded page about Fox Preserve

On a recent visit to continue my wildflower inventory of this preserve, I compiled a number of photographs to capture views along the two trails within Fox Preserve in the Town of Colonie.  View the expanded page.

If you have an opportunity to visit this preserve this week, you’ll observe numerous Dame’s Rockets in full bloom (pink and white flowers) throughout the property, but especially along the latter third of the Orange Trail as it passes along and near Shaker Creek.

Stop by this property, owned by the Mohawk-Hudson Land Conservancy, to enjoy a picnic on the preserve’s hilltop overlooking the Mohawk River.

Happy trails!

Spring Wildflower Sampler – Part 8

Having had taken the day off from work, I decided to return trailside to continue my wildflower inventory along the Community Connector Trail in the Towns of Clifton Park and Halfmoon. I walked along the eastern half (located in both Towns) today because I had hoped to see Glaucous Honeysuckle in bloom.  No such luck – I already missed its brief blooming period this year!

In any event, since the forecasted thunderstorms never materialized (thank goodness), I enjoyed a productive inventory visit by finding another nine new species.

I observed the following blooms today –

Rattlesnake Weed  (bloom) – one of the nine species I had not yet observed along this trail.

Rattlesnake Weed  (leaves – purple veins are this plant’s very visible identification characteristic)

Clustered Snakeroot

Sweet Cicely

Black Locust

Asparagus

Fox Grape

Smooth Solomon’s Seal

Common Blackberry

Carrion Flower

Happy Memorial Day everyone!

And, happy trails!

Spring Wildflower Sampler – Part 7

Despite heavily filtered sunshine today, the forecast indicated that this would be the only mostly rain-free day of this long weekend.  So, I seized the opportunity and decided to continue wildflower inventory at Settlers Hill Natural Area. This trail network is located in the Town of Clifton Park and it is comprised of two different segments –

  • East trail: Beginning at Gloucester Street, this trail segment heads south across Clifton Park Center Road, Michelle Drive, Waverly Place, Summerlin Drive and Avenue of the Oaks (twice) before terminating a short distance south of 4 Leaf Manor.
  • West trail: Beginning at either access point off Addison Way or Fairhill Road, these two access trails will intersect and then this trail segment heads west across Moe Road before generally heading south and terminating at Wildflower Drive.

Thankfully, the sunshine did indeed prompt a number of blooming species to fully open their blooms for easy viewing.  This is a sampling of what I observed today –

Thyme-leaved Sandwort

Prickly Dewberry

Mouse Ear

Autumn-olive

Common Barberry

Germander Speedwell

False Solomon’s-seal

Black Cherry

Yellow Wood Sorrel

Dwarf Cinquefoil

Common Buckthorn (invasive)

Nannyberry

Stout Blue-eyed Grass

Asiatic Bittersweet (invasive)

Wishing everyone a safe and very enjoyable Memorial Day weekend.

Happy trails!

Spring Wildflower Sampler – Part 5

Even though the forecast called for 100% chance of rain today, the delayed start prompted me to get out early to see how much of my continuing wildflower inventory at Settlers Hill Natural Area I could complete before the rains began.  This trail network is located in the Town of Clifton Park and it is comprised of two different segments –

  • East trail: Beginning at Gloucester Street, this trail segment heads south across Clifton Park Center Road, Michelle Drive, Waverly Place, Summerlin Drive and Avenue of the Oaks (twice) before terminating a short distance south of 4 Leaf Manor.
  • West trail: Beginning at either access point off Addison Way or Fairhill Road, these two access trails will intersect and then this trail segment heads west across Moe Road before generally heading south and terminating at Wildflower Drive.

As it turned out, I was able to inventory the entire system.  However, not before becoming quite damp as the initial mist gradually became a light shower.

This is a sampling of what I observed today –

Ragged Robin

Wild Geranium

Tower-mustard

Canada Mayflower

Hooked Crowfoot

Mayapple

Flowering Dogwood

English Plantain

Black Chokeberry

Tall Buttercup

Happy trails!